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Post your experiences, questions and answers about growing wild-simulated ginseng

TOPIC: GROWING for a LIVING (who actually can do it ? )

Re:GROWING for a LIVING (who actually can do it ? ) 6 years 1 month ago #12264

I'd have to agree w/ Hillhopper. Quote: \"You can count on your first couple or three years allowing you to learn so.... start slowly and work your way up. Better a mistake with a couple pound of seed than with thirty.\"

It can be a steep learning curve. Or, better put: \"learning thru frustrations!\"

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Re:GROWING for a LIVING (who actually can do it ? ) 6 years 1 month ago #12537

This to me is a good topic. Been thinking seriously about planting many more seeds and having a farm full of roots in the years to come. One has to know some information first, This 'FARM' was originally a ginseng farm dated back in the 1800's. I am thinking if they could do it , so could I. 200 acres total and many many wooded acres. the original settlers here grew it under shade houses. I plant seeds every year up in the wooded forests. Has anyone ever planted rootlets? Like more information.(please)

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Re:GROWING for a LIVING (who actually can do it ? ) 6 years 1 month ago #12545

  • BeastMaster
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Never planted rootlets, but, by reading on here, it's obvious that seeds, even stratified seeds, have a very low germination rate, at least the first year, and thus, is a hit-miss deal. I'm going to plant rootlets from here on out.

It's like planting 'maters from seeds vs. starting them in a hothouse in Feb.
My rural friends who start their tomatoes in late winter then move them to the garden in late Apr. always have ripe 'maters before I finally get some in mid July.

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Re:GROWING for a LIVING (who actually can do it ? ) 6 years 1 month ago #12546

Seeds are the way to go in my opinion unless you get an exceptional price on 2 to 3 year old rootlets.
Latt

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Re:GROWING for a LIVING (who actually can do it ? ) 6 years 1 month ago #12549

Yes, seeds are the best way to go.

I usually get atleast 65% germination. Atleast 4500 seedlings from one pound of seeds planted. Cost $70 plus shipping.

To get that many two - three year old rootlets to come up in the spring would cost $3500 or more.

For $3500 you could buy atleast 50 lbs of seeds.

Seeds are definately the way to get a large amount of seng growing.

classicfur

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Re:GROWING for a LIVING (who actually can do it ? ) 6 years 1 month ago #12550

BeastMaster wrote:

Never planted rootlets, but, by reading on here, it's obvious that seeds, even stratified seeds, have a very low germination rate, at least the first year, and thus, is a hit-miss deal. I'm going to plant rootlets from here on out.

It's like planting 'maters from seeds vs. starting them in a hothouse in Feb.
My rural friends who start their tomatoes in late winter then move them to the garden in late Apr. always have ripe 'maters before I finally get some in mid July.


Like Classicfur and I had stated, seeds are the way to go. Planting a small number of rootlets will get you a jump on it. However if you are growing ginseng to sell down the road, seed is the way to go if you are trying to plant the most amount of ginseng for the least amount of money and time invested.
Latt

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Re:GROWING for a LIVING (who actually can do it ? ) 6 years 1 month ago #12569

The best place to purchase seeds from? Here?

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Re:GROWING for a LIVING (who actually can do it ? ) 6 years 1 month ago #12576

That is a tough question. There are so many variables that come into play. What are your goals in planting? Obviously we all want to buy the best seed at the lowest price possible.

With that said there is seed typically avail from $50 to $200 per lb for stratified ginseng seed with $70 to $140 per lb being the reasonable range and $100 per lbs being the average. The lowest price seed being from \"Shade Grown Field Cultivated\" gardens and the most expensive coming from so called \"Wild Simulated\" stock from the woods. But this is not always the case.

Now there is much to consider as there is everything from \"A\" to \"Z\" in between.
I have bought the best seed and had bad germination and I have bought cheep seed and had great germination.

Many studies have been done on the topic of how well a seed does if it is being shipped and grown in an area that it is not native too. For example will a seed from a plant in NY grow well in Tennessee and so on.

There are many concerns as to whether seed from cultivated stock in Wisconsin will have the genetics to endure the stressful conditions if planted in a woods environment. Many think that cultivated plants that are sprayed and pampered will produce seed that has lost its ability to adapt to conditions in the woods.

However, many say that growers in Wisconsin and Ontario have developed seed that has become hardy due to selective trait engineering.

Farmers are planting corn seed that has been developed over the years to be able to do things that farmers desire. So it only makes sense that ginseng growers in Wisconsin have done the same to seed that has been selectively harvested and replanted over the last 100 years.

I think it comes down to this. Call seed suppliers and ask why they recommend their seed. Buy some seed from different suppliers and see how their seed does. Last but least do not think that paying a high price for seed is going to give you the best seed or that buying cheep seed is going to give you the biggest bang for your buck. Very confusing I know.

You will learn what supplier works for you over time.

Here is a links of a few seed suppliers but there are other good ones out there that are not listed on this link. I am not suggesting everyone on this link is or isn't a good source to buy from. I am not going to recommend one over the other but at least this gives you some contacts:

www.dcnr.state.pa.us/forestry/wildplant/ginsengsuppliers.aspx

Remember, this Wildgrown.com site sells ginseng seed and many state they have had great results.
Latt

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Re:GROWING for a LIVING (who actually can do it ? ) 6 years 1 month ago #12614

My goals in planting ? to put back in the nature what has been taken away. Also to grow my own crop to have in the years to come. I am talking of seeding perhaps a half acre of land. Speaking of ginseng...Today I went out on untouched grounds and it was nice! Found nice strong large plants. Many berries on the plants that were put directly back from where the root was harvested from. Plants differ in different soil types. The ones around this farm are of a lighter green color(leaves) and where we went today they were a strong darker green color. It was great since we found a patch of about 20 plants all in one spot. All of which were five ,six and seven prongs! Latt, I so appreciate all the information you have given to me on seeds. I look forward to more conversations here on this site! You all are great and helpful! Thanks Again!

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Re:GROWING for a LIVING (who actually can do it ? ) 6 years 1 month ago #12627

Irishjewels.
That is awesome you have a new spot that has seng in it. I have found that ginseng with darker leaves is typically growing in soil with the needed minerals and great calcium levels and PH level. When they are light green they are typically growing in soil that does not have the same good minerals and nutrients as the soil where the leaves are dark green. Light green leaves are even thinner to the tough than the dark green leaves which are hardier and a bit thicker. I am not saying ginseng growing in the area that has the lighter leaves has bad soil. I just think the soil that is growing nice dark leaves has more of what ginseng needs.
Latt

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